Artifact Blogging Grounds

A community of blogs from ancient artifact enthusiasts. Blogs pertain to Indian relics, ancient artifacts, and artifact collections.
Aug 16, 2010

Curious Hoe

Jim Bennett

Often in collections I find that the collector who previously owned and assembled the collection either made, or bought, an axe, celt or other tool that was modernly hafted to a handle. I think these are great examples to show kids and new collectors as it gives them a visual of how these items were hafted in ancient times.

The two items to left were in a collection I bought some time ago, and they are an authentic axe, and an authentic celt, that were recently placed into handles for just this purpose.


Jim Bennett

A customer today asked me about how to tell if Mississippian pottery is authentic. I am far from being an expert on pottery, but in the last year I have spent alot of time talking with Matt Rowe down in Oklahoma who is an expert. Matt does restoration, and I find him to be a very reliable source for artifact information, and an extremely honest person. If you visit his website at www.arrowheads1.com you will see how much work he has done for the artifact community.

Anyways, although I cannot post a course on how to tell good from bad pottery, I can share a couple small things that people new to pottery may find interesting.


Aug 16, 2010

Tinder Starters

Jim Bennett

One of the daily tasks ancient man had was getting his fires started, and one way that was done was with friction. We have all seen images in movies of a stick being spun in hand or with the use of a bow drill to create friction which would then catch some dried moss or similar substance on fire. Rocks like the one pictured here were used for starting a fire by friction.


Aug 15, 2010

Bone Hoe - Tool

Jim Bennett

 


Jim Bennett

I was talking with a customer a few days ago about pottery and how hard it can be to detect restoration.  I mentioned to him that I had access to the analysis of some rare Quapaw pottery that the Museum of Native American Artifacts had sent out for CT scanning and study to a company called Rare Collections (www.rare-collections.com).  This company is on the cutting edge of identifying reproduction and restored artifacts for museums and collectors around the world.
The analysis consisted of CT scanning, high-resolution photography, thermoluminescence (TL) testing, microscopy, UV and IR analysis. While we can look at a flint point under a 10x loop or scope and see what we need on the surface - for pottery you need to be able to see inside it to actually see all that needs to be seen.
A few images from the analysis have been graciously provided by for this posting by Rare-Collections (© 2007 Rare Collections) and it is greatly appreciated as the sharing of infomation about topics such as this need to published.
Most of us will probably never own the high end type vessels shown here - but this study represents what kind of restoration is being done on all levels of pottery, not just the museum grade relics.







Aug 15, 2010

Flint Saws

Jim Bennett

I have only come across a few examples of what are called "Flint Saws" in the last decade or so, but I know that many are out there. Saws are made off a large spall or flake, and are unifacially flaked (flakes off one side only) 


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