Artifact Blogging Grounds

A community of blogs from ancient artifact enthusiasts. Blogs pertain to Indian relics, ancient artifacts, and artifact collections.
Todd Walterspaugh

I am a lucky man!  Not only do I have 5 wonderful children who share my love of Native American Culture I also have a beautiful wife Jeni who supports me and my intrest in collecting artifacts. We live in a small town in Michigan known as Galesburg which is just outside of Kalamazoo. As active and supporting members of the Wolverine State Archaeological Society Jeni and I regularly attend shows together. We enjoy surface hunting for artifacts but sadly here in Michigan it usually produces very few finds - but that doesn't sop us from trying!
 
 As our collecting intrests grew over the years and we decided to go online with a website in 2001. There we offer sales and services of Authentic Native American Artifacts. It can be found at www.allpointscovered.com  If you visit the website please view our gallery of some Relics from our personal collection. We have made friendships from across the country with people who share a common intrest "Collecting Indian Relics".
 To the left of this page you will find our Artifacts Gallery. All kinds of pictures will be posted from Museums to artifacts and friends. The gallery will be updated often so be sure and check it out frequently.
 Above the Gallery you will find our Categories section. I have many ideas for this area including a Book Nook where I will post several book's I have read over the years and would recommend to others. Also a Movie section for recommended Native American themed movies. Many other's so please check back often.. We encourage your feedback and comments in the categories area - don't be shy we wnat to hear from you!!
 We will do our best to make this Blog not only fun but informative as well! If you would like to rate our Blog you can do so by clicking on the stars to the left below Educational Value Rating.

May your next find be your best!





Aug 16, 2010

Curiously Salvaged Axe

Jim Bennett

When it comes to Ancient Axes, most of us are familiar with the 1/2 groove, 3/4 groove, full groove, the rare double grooved - but has anyone ever seen a a doube 90 degree angle 3/4 groove? I think this could go down as a one of a kind - as many creatively salvaged artifacts can.

This is one of the stranger salvaged stone relics I have come across. Many of my customers and friends know that I am very intrigued by anciently salvaged artifacts, and while some people go from table to table at shows looking for G-10's at a good buy - I tend to scour the junk boxes and bargain bins for some ancient salvage that someone has missed.

I ran into Matt Rowe from Oklahoma at a show down in Arkansas this spring, and he had this beauty. We scratched our heads trying to figure out the story behind the strange shape, and I decided on the spot that I had to talk him out of this one. How can anyone pass up such a ... a... well, ok - its not exactly a beauty - but it sure looked cool - and no doubt, a subject of an ancient salvage job.


Aug 16, 2010

Bear Effigy

Jim Bennett

It's amazing how often artifacts tend to travel from one part of the county to another. A point found in California gets left to a family member from Idaho who sells the collection to a collector in Illinois who breaks some out and sells a portion to a guy in New Jersey. It happens all the time.
Just because a relic is in an old collection from one area never means that artifact is from that particular area. Many people collect from all over, and collectors have been doing that since collecting began.

Often I will hear someone say "well, I am not sure exactly where it came from, but the collection was in Texas". OK, but just because the collection was assembled in Texas certainly doesn't mean all the artifacts in the collection are from Texas. I think this is one way incorrect provenience gets associated with a particular item.


Aug 16, 2010

My New Rock

Jim Bennett

While I was at the Expo I got a chance to look over alot of artifacts, purchase some good ole ancient relics to run in the next catalog, and to simply enjoy seeing some of the "best of the best" artifacts that were there on display. Of course, I was also looking over the many tables for those little oddities that I like to collect personally - salvaged relics, abnormally styled stone and flints etc.

As I walked past one table, an artifact caught my attention - not because it was a G-10 example of some great rarity, and not because it was a great example of ancient craftsmanship, but rather because it looked totally out of place amidst the other flint points, slate ornaments and stone tools which covered the tops of most of the tables.


Aug 16, 2010

Rare hafted Knife

Jim Bennett

When I first saw this knife sitting on a display table in Oklahoma, I was surprised to see it was still hafted to the original handle. Many times, broken authentic knives are put into recently made handles as examples of how they appeared in ancient times - this was not the case with this one - it was the real deal. I talked to the owner, and he explained the item was found in a rock bluff in Peco Texas.

Most knives, due to moisture and time, have seen their handles rot away and the only thing remaining are the flint points we collect. Occasionally though, knives were tucked away in dry environment areas out of the weather, and so they are able to remain in-tact. It is a rarity, but it does happen. Normally, these pieces are found in the desert southwest parts of the country, and were recovered back at the turn of the century were such areas were being explored for the first time. Occasionally they were tucked away in boxes and attics, and every once in a while one will surface.


Aug 16, 2010

Etched Slate

Jim Bennett

I just got in a new consignment from a local friend of mine who just purchased a nice little Ashland County, Ohio collection. We sat at the kitchen table tonight for several hours drinking coffee, talking relics and looking over the artifacts in the collection. There are few things in life I enjoy more than an evening spent talking with friends over coffee and artifacts. This was one of those collections that had a little bit of everything in it. Nice relics from most of the time periods, some slate and stone artifacts, and those great little cigar boxs of broken relics, scrapers, knives and debitage. I love going through cigar boxes. It's like opening Christmas presents as a kid, - what little oddities or hidden treasures might be waiting in those boxes.

When we got done going through the items, we had sorted out the below consignment, and in there were a couple neat items I thought I would post here on the blog. Of course - I did find a wonderful artifact to add to my collection before we were done


Members Login



Latest Entries